french writer, sadomasochist
french writer, sadomasochist
i like art, gore, and lonely landscapes.

emetodoll:

universalperson:

emetodoll:

WHY DOES SUCH A POORLY EXECUTED MOVIE HAVE TO BE SO BEAUTIFULLY ANIMATED

I FEEL DIRTY FOR LIKING IT

Perhaps it’s not as poorly executed as you think. :-p

oh, there’s definitely a lot that the film has going for it in what it does well—the symbolism, the soundtrack and animation, things of that nature—yet the ending seems to subvert a LOT of what made the series itself so beautifully done.

(and this is ignoring some of the gross stuff urobuchi said in interviews. if it’s not apparent from watching/analyzing the show, it’s not worth noting.)

in the series homura’s choices are painted as morally gray; she starts off with pure intentions that gradually become warped with the repetition, becoming more obsessive and harmful to madoka and others, but she never is intentionally malicious or psychopathic— her steely facade wears her down emotionally. her devotion to saving madoka is unhealthy, but at the same time madoka is her only hope for salvation.

whether homura’s actions are selfish or selfless is arguable, and that’s sort of the point. she’s not supposed to be the ultimate good or ultimate evil; she’s a young girl whose good intentions paved her road to hell.

but in the film, the viewer is basically bashed over the head with a very definite declaration that homura is corrupt, and that her motives are destructive and selfish. going further, it tells us that it’s not just homura as a person who is bad, but that her love is evil as well, which diverges wildly from the feeling of PMMM the series.

basically it ruins the emotional depth and complexity of homura as a character.

and plus, that whole yandere oooh demon “love” is cliche, boring, and predictable. i expected better than that.


posted 1 day ago on 17/4/2014 - 7 notes - via

posted 3 days ago on 16/4/2014 - 2,645 notes - via | ©

kandour:

a pretty day in my garden


posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 12,543 notes - via | ©

no23:

Takuma Nakahira, via.


posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 7,940 notes - via | ©

posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 4,570 notes - via | ©

heaven and (s)hell, sonoita, arizona

heaven and (s)hell, sonoita, arizona


posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 6,511 notes - via | ©
helainetieu:


Real-life Grave of the Fireflies: (Photo) Stoic Japanese orphan, standing at attention having brought his dead younger brother to a cremation pyre, Nagasaki, by Joe O’Donnell 1945

This photograph was taken by an American photojournalist, Joe O’Donnell, in Nagasaki in 1945.
He recently spoke to a Japanese interviewer about this picture:

“I saw a boy about ten years old walking by. He was carrying a baby on his back. In those days in Japan, we often saw children playing with their little brothers or sisters on their backs, but this boy was clearly different. I could see that he had come to this place for a serious reason. He was wearing no shoes. His face was hard. The little head was tipped back as if the baby were fast asleep.
“The boy stood there for five or ten minutes. The men in white masks walked over to him and quietly began to take off the rope that was holding the baby. That is when I saw that the baby was already dead. The men held the body by the hands and feet and placed it on the fire.
“The boy stood there straight without moving, watching the flames. He was biting his lower lip so hard that it shone with blood. The flame burned low like the sun going down. The boy turned around and walked silently away.



Cry every time

helainetieu:

Real-life Grave of the Fireflies: (Photo) Stoic Japanese orphan, standing at attention having brought his dead younger brother to a cremation pyre, Nagasaki, by Joe O’Donnell 1945

This photograph was taken by an American photojournalist, Joe O’Donnell, in Nagasaki in 1945.

He recently spoke to a Japanese interviewer about this picture:

“I saw a boy about ten years old walking by. He was carrying a baby on his back. In those days in Japan, we often saw children playing with their little brothers or sisters on their backs, but this boy was clearly different. I could see that he had come to this place for a serious reason. He was wearing no shoes. His face was hard. The little head was tipped back as if the baby were fast asleep.

“The boy stood there for five or ten minutes. The men in white masks walked over to him and quietly began to take off the rope that was holding the baby. That is when I saw that the baby was already dead. The men held the body by the hands and feet and placed it on the fire.

“The boy stood there straight without moving, watching the flames. He was biting his lower lip so hard that it shone with blood. The flame burned low like the sun going down. The boy turned around and walked silently away.

Cry every time


posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 68,310 notes - via | ©

i really don’t know how anyone can actually like the alpha kids/dancestors to be honest


posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 1 note

on one hand i want to reread homestuck but on the other it would be like picking at the awful festering wound that is everything after cascade and i dont know if i’m ready for that hurt again


posted 3 days ago on 15/4/2014 -
tags: #homestuck

posted 4 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 17,702 notes - via | ©

meladoodle:

i wanna be a reverse tooth fairy where i rob people and then scatter human teeth on their bed


posted 4 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 254,578 notes - via | ©
thisblueboy:

Jean-Honore Fragonard (Grasse 1732-1806 Paris), The Fountain of Love, ca.1785, The J. Paul Getty Museum

thisblueboy:

Jean-Honore Fragonard (Grasse 1732-1806 Paris), The Fountain of Love, ca.1785, The J. Paul Getty Museum


posted 4 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 117 notes - via | ©

posted 4 days ago on 15/4/2014 - 13,075 notes - via | ©
livinglense:

Astronaut Charles Duke visited the moon in 1972 as part of the Apollo 16 mission. He left behind a picture of himself, with his wife and two sons. He took a picture of it before he left. The photograph remains on the moon’s surface.

livinglense:

Astronaut Charles Duke visited the moon in 1972 as part of the Apollo 16 mission. He left behind a picture of himself, with his wife and two sons. He took a picture of it before he left. The photograph remains on the moon’s surface.


posted 4 days ago on 14/4/2014 - 6,924 notes - via | ©

posted 5 days ago on 14/4/2014 - 52,828 notes - via | ©